ContraVision Study Video - Utopia

Utopia:

This video was developed as a provocation used in a study exploring public perceptions towards potential future digital manufacturing technologies. The study was based on the ContraVision Technique, which poses extreme, alternative viewpoints on an envisioned product or service, via a series of fictional narratives, or “provocations.” In this case, this film provides a fictional perspective of a “Utopian” vision of digital manufacturing, where technology is harnessed for the good of society and workers interact effectively and productively with it. In the ContraVision technique, the “Utopian” vision is contrasted with a corresponding “Dystopian” vision; presenting alternative viewpoints on futuristic topics in this way can stimulate discussion in interviews, focus groups, and/or questionnaires with viewers, and this can encourage a wider range of feedback than by just presenting a single viewpoint.

Credits: Dr Richard Ramchurn and AlbinoMosquito Productions

http://doi.org/10.17639/nott.7176

ContraVision Study Video - Dystopia

Dystopia:

This video was developed as a provocation used in a study exploring public perceptions towards potential future digital manufacturing technologies. The study was based on the ContraVision Technique, which poses extreme, alternative viewpoints on an envisioned product or service, via a series of fictional narratives, or “provocations.” In this case, this film provides a fictional perspective of a “Dystopian” vision of digital manufacturing, where technology is used to control the workforce and leads to invasions of personal privacy. In the ContraVision technique, the “Dystopian” vision is contrasted with a corresponding “Utopian” vision; presenting alternative viewpoints on futuristic topics in this way can stimulate discussion in interviews, focus groups, and/or questionnaires with viewers, and this can encourage a wider range of feedback than by just presenting a single viewpoint.

Credits: Dr Richard Ramchurn and AlbinoMosquito Productions

http://doi.org/10.17639/nott.7176